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CRO (Conversion Rate Optimization)

You've managed to get a lot of traffic to your site with the help of SEO, SEA and social media. Now you probably think you're there? Unfortunately, you don't get much out of driving traffic to your site if it doesn't lead to a conversion. Many site owners spend most of their time trying to get traffic to their site, but hardly any of their time trying to improve their conversion rates. In this article, we will help you on your way to successful conversion rate optimization.

What is CRO? What does it mean?

CRO stands for Conversion Rate Optimization and occupies an important place in online marketing. In a nutshell, CRO means structurally increasing the number of website visitors who proceed to a conversion. But what exactly is a conversion? Good question, read on.

What is a conversion?

A conversion goes beyond placing an order in a web shop. There are so many different conversions that it is difficult to name them all here. At The Dare Company, we speak of a conversion when a visitor completes the desired goal on the website. These goals can be the following:

  • Placing an order
  • Clicking on the phone number
  • Clicking on the e-mail address
  • Placing an order on a web shop
  • Send a contact request
  • Submit a request for quotation
  • Etc.

In the field of CRO, we speak of micro and macro conversions. The difference between the two is explained below:

Micro conversion is a conversion that represents a small value. A good example is clicking on the phone number or the email address. This person may contact you because a large order needs to be placed or because the person in question has a simple question.

Macro conversion is a conversion that represents a large value. Think of placing an order in a web shop. These conversions provide you with direct revenue and are therefore desired conversions.

At The Dare Company, we aim to measure both micro and macro conversions, as this contains very valuable information. If a website provides services, it is interesting to look especially at requests for this service.

Why apply CRO?

Of course, you ask yourself why should I apply CRO within my online marketing strategy? Simple, you want to get returns from your website, especially if you advertise, and CRO can help you do that. The example below explains this well:

In this example, we are buying advertising through Google Ads.

Ad-Spend

Website visitors

Conversion rate

Conversions

€10.000

5.000

1%

50


To double the number of conversions, it is possible to double the Ad-spend. The following example clearly shows this:

Ad-Spend

Website visitors

Conversion rate

Conversions

€20.000

10.000

1%

100


This seems like a good strategy to get more conversions, but it is not cheap. After all, your advertising budget has doubled and the return is still the same. This is where CRO comes in. Now imagine that instead of doubling the ad spend, we double the conversion rate. The example below illustrates this well. 

Ad-Spend

Website visitors

Conversion rate

Conversions

€10.000

5.000

2%

100


The example above clearly shows that with the same advertising budget, 2X as many conversions were achieved.

How do you apply CRO to your website?

Now that you know what CRO is and what its effects are, one burning question remains: How do I apply CRO to my website? Below, we discuss the implementation of CRO.

Where do most visitors drop out?

Before we start thinking about implementing CRO at all, we first look at the places on the site where visitors drop out. For this, we use Google Analytics. Suppose that we see from Google Analytics that many visitors drop out during the payment process of the web shop, then we can use this data to find out why. There are various tools and techniques that can provide insight into this. We will go through these with you below.

Heatmaps: A heatmap is a representation of a page that shows where visitors click. Thanks to this technique, you gain insight into the clicks of the visitors.

Mousetracking: Mousetracking is a way of following the visitor's mouse. This can also provide very relevant information.

Hotjar: Hotjar is a program that allows you to create heatmaps and implement mousetracking on your site.

tell stories

Okay, now you've made it clear where most visitors drop off within the payment process. Now it's time to determine what you want to change about the payment process hoping that more visitors place an order. When applying the tools and techniques described above, you will often come across bottlenecks that cause your visitors to drop out. Once these bottlenecks have been identified, you can think of a way to remove them. But how do you know if your idea will lead to a higher conversion? This is where the A/B test comes in.

The A/B test

To determine whether your solution to the bottleneck is the right one, you need to run an A/B test. But what is an A/B test? In an A/B test, you create 2 versions of the website with one change. It is obvious what this one change is. Namely your idea for solving the bottleneck. Now the A/B tool divides your visitors fairly between these 2 versions. This way, over time you will be able to see which of the two versions of your site generates the most conversions. If it turns out that your idea for solving the bottlenecks actually generates more conversions, implement this change and you will have increased the conversion ratio of your website. Awesome!